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Share links: Drug War, DrugWar, drugwar, and majority. See drug war charts.
See categories: Charts and graphs and maps. See also: Private prisons and private power. See The U.S. Drug War. Republicans lead. Democrats follow. Everybody pays. See Race, ethnicity, and the drug war. See Cannabis is safer. See Torture, rape, beatings, searches, disappearances and the Drug War.

Incarceration Nation.. By Fareed Zakaria, Time magazine, April 02, 2012. "America's War on Drugs Drives High Incarceration Rates."

The majority of people incarcerated in prisons and jails in the USA are in due to drug-related offenses, crimes to get money for drugs, or drug-related parole or probation violations. Wikipedia: Drug-related crime. The number of inmates in the USA has increased almost 5 times over since 1980. The USA has the highest incarceration rate of any nation (b c). Compare incarceration rates worldwide. See cost of U.S. drug war: 1.5 trillion dollars! Cannabis is safer! Share link.
U.S. incarceration timeline 4

Obama turning around Reagan-Bush War on Pot, mandatory minimums, and incarceration totals:

Human cost of U.S. drug war Edit

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See: Portal: Drug war charts and maps and Portal: Brutality and the drug war.
See list of incarceration rates by country (b c). Compare the rates. Due to the Drug War the USA has the highest incarceration rate in the world. See cost of U.S. drug war: 1.5 trillion dollars! Let's Break the Taboo! Cannabis is safer! Share link.
U.S. cannabis arrests by year

More info, sources, data table.

Correctional population: Prisons, jails, probation, parole. To the chart percentages below add in the percentages for crimes to get money for drugs, drug-related parole violations, etc..
Share of U.S. correctional population in for drugs

Source: Prisons & Drug Offenders. Drug War Facts.

Correctional population USA

USA: Peak of 7.3 million people in 2007 under adult correctional supervision: On probation or parole, or incarcerated in jail or prison. About 3.2% of the U.S. adult population, or 1 in every 31 adults. More info here. See template.

True cost of drugs: More than half of inmates currently in U.S. federal prisons were convicted of narcotics offences. June 12, 2011. Daily Mail. The article discusses state prisons, too. Also, it discusses many aspects of drug-related crimes. For example; "The second main area is economic-related crimes where an individual commits a crime to fund a drug habit. These include theft and prostitution."

Drugs and Crime Facts: Drug Use and Crime. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics: "In 2004, 17% of state prisoners and 18% of federal inmates said they committed their current offense to obtain money for drugs. In 2002 about a quarter of convicted property and drug offenders in local jails had committed their crimes to get money for drugs, compared to 5% of violent and public order offenders. Among state prisoners in 2004 the pattern was similar, with property (30%) and drug offenders (26%) more likely to commit their crimes for drug money than violent (10%) and public-order offenders (7%). In federal prisons property offenders (11%) were less than half as likely as drug offenders (25%) to report drug money as a motive in their offenses."

16.1% is the percentage of parole violators returned to state prisons in 1997 for drug related violations; for failing drug tests, possession of drugs, failing to report for drug testing, failing to report for alcohol or drug treatment. Info is from Table 21 of this report: Trends in State Parole, 1990-2000. NCJ 184735. October 2001. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Jimmie Carter: Call Off the Global Drug War. In New York Times: "Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger pointed out that, in 1980, 10 percent of his state’s budget went to higher education and 3 percent to prisons; in 2010, almost 11 percent went to prisons and only 7.5 percent to higher education. Maybe the increased tax burden on wealthy citizens necessary to pay for the war on drugs will help to bring about a reform of America’s drug policies." -- June 16, 2011 article.

Welcome to America Edit

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Most inmates are incarcerated due to the drug war. The drug war and prisons are big business, and a big part of how the 1% controls the 99%. Republicans lead the racist drug war. Democrats follow since many are bought-and-paid-for middle management for K Street lobbyists. See sources, stats, and charts for the banner below.
USA. 25% of world's prisoners 3

NAACP, ACLU File Lawsuit Against City of Philadelphia for Rejecting Criminal Justice Reform Ad. Article by NAACP. Lawsuit filed October 19, 2011. Also see article by Courthouse News Service. Image info. Facebook comments. See billboard and stats.

USA and territories. 2,424,279 inmates in 2008. ...
In 2008 with less than 5% of world population the USA had over 2.4 million of 9.8 million world prisoners (b). See latest numbers and World Prison Population List. The majority of inmates in the USA are in due to the drug war. The number of inmates in the USA has increased almost 5 times over since 1980.
Chart below is from a July 2000 report:
USA versus Europe

From this July 2000 report: Poor Prescription: The Costs of Imprisoning Drug Offenders in the United States.

Length of sentences causes huge U.S. incarceration rate Edit

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American Exception. Inmate Count in US Dwarfs Other Nations'. April 22, 2008. New York Times. Page 1, section A, front page. Archive. From the article (emphasis added):

Still, it is the length of sentences that truly distinguishes American prison policy. Indeed, the mere number of sentences imposed here would not place the United States at the top of the incarceration lists. If lists were compiled based on annual admissions to prison per capita, several European countries would outpace the United States. But American prison stays are much longer, so the total incarceration rate is higher. ... "Rises and falls in Canada's crime rate have closely paralleled America's for 40 years," Mr. Tonry wrote last year. "But its imprisonment rate has remained stable."
Incarceration rates worldwide

See sourcing here. See charts and maps. Go here for latest incarceration rates for many nations. See Wikipedia list. See this category. Share link.

US incarceration timeline

November Coalition graph. Some Congressmen and police who prosecuted the War on Drugs now believe it caused a large increase in the United States incarceration rate. See Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, and larger chart with sources. See template.


2003. Federal Judge Quits, Calls Judicial System Unjust. Associated Press (AP) story, National Public Radio interview, and Judge John S. Martin's statement. "The result, he said, is a slew of lengthy prison sentences for low-level drug dealers 'who society failed at every step.' ... While many judges have criticized sentencing guidelines, it is unusual for a judge to publicly cite the frustrations of the job in stepping down." -June 25 2003 AP story. See also: Let Judges Do Their Jobs. By Hon. John S. Martin Jr..

Dissenting Opinions of Judges, Federal Drug Sentencing, Mandatory Minimum Sentences. A list of many articles by judges. At November Coalition.

Mandatory Minimum sentences or truth in sentencing Edit

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See also: National Rifle Association and mandatory minimum sentencing.
Some people don't know that the National Rifle Association had a large part in causing the huge increase in the U.S. incarceration rate. The NRA strongly lobbied state-by-state for mandatory minimum sentences (also known as "Truth in Sentencing"), and "Two and Three Strikes" laws. Mandatory-minimum sentences are the root cause of the astronomical US incarceration rate according to a New York Times article. The majority of people incarcerated in the U.S. are in prison or jail due to drug-related offenses, crimes to get money for drugs, or drug-related parole or probation violations. For more info see National Rifle Association and mandatory minimum sentencing. See template.


See Wikipedia: Mandatory sentencing. See also this page. Mandatory Minimum sentencing is often used for non-violent crimes such as drug possession. It is a modern-day way to create concentration camps for drug-using "undesirables." Sentences that usually do not allow parole until at least around 80% of the sentence served. Federal laws, and most states, have mandatory minimums. The majority of U.S. prisoners are in due to the drug war in some way or another.

See Wikipedia: War on Drugs, and Wikipedia: Sentencing Reform Act.

Life for Pot Edit

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www.lifeforpot.com - a website about federal, non-violent, marijuana-only inmates serving sentences of life without parole. Share this link in email, on Facebook, on Twitter, etc..

War on Drugs Edit

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Republican evil, Democrat complicity, corporatist control: The Drug-War Industrial Complex.

Drug War Invented by Nixon to Extend His Power. By Fintan O'Toole. Aug. 13, 1999. Irish Times.

In June 1971 Richard Nixon declared a "War on Drugs."

Nancy and Ronald 6 Wilson 6 Reagan 6 riding the drug war Beast. Note Nancy's "Just Say NO" sign. Larger image.
Just Say No. Nancy and Ronald Reagan
Nixon victory stance
Tricky Dick Nixon (above) has won his drug war! The Prison-Industrial Complex. Corporatist Dictatorship. A Nixonian "enemies list" that almost everyone is on at some time.

"Nearly one in four persons (23.7%) imprisoned in the United States is currently imprisoned for a drug offense. The number of persons behind bars for drug offenses (458,131) is roughly the same as the entire prison and jail population in 1980 (474,368)." -- From this July 2000 report: Poor Prescription: The Costs of Imprisoning Drug Offenders in the United States. See also: [10].

Number and percentage of prisoners whose primary and/or most serious crime was a drug offense: 8% in 1980. 23% in 1998. Based on federal estimates of state and federal drug prisoners. Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Crimes concerning money for drugs Edit

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"We are the party of lower taxes for the American people". - John Boehner, Republican Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. December 21, 2011. Share link.
US criminal justice cost timeline

$228 billion total in 2007 according to BJS data. $36 billion in 1982 (not adjusted for inflation). Detailed costs table is archived here (scroll down). See inflation-adjusted chart. BJS is U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. The majority of prisoners are incarcerated due to the drug war. See drug war charts and maps. Correction costs alone averaged $30,600 per inmate in 2007.

Emphasis added to the quotes.

"The FBI has reported that almost one-third of people convicted of robbery and burglary, and more than one-quarter of people convicted of larceny, committed their crimes to get money for drugs. Moreover, 6.5 percent of the murders in the United States in 1990 occurred in narcotics-related circumstances" -- Rethinking America's wasteful war on illicit drugs. By Jerry V. Wilson (former chief of police for the District of Columbia). Jan. 18, 1994. Washington Post.

The Nov. 2, 1995 Chicago Tribune reported: "The latest Bureau of Justice Statistics [BJS] survey of U.S. prison inmates in 1991 found that 27 percent of robbers admitted they committed crimes to buy drugs; 30 percent of burglars said so, and 5 percent of convicted murderers did." -- See Table 3 in the BJS report Fact Sheet: Drug-Related Crime. September 1994, NCJ–149286.

"According to the 1991 joint survey of Federal and State prison inmates, an estimated 17 percent of State prisoners and 10 percent of Federal prisoners reported committing their offense to get money to buy drugs; of those incarcerated for robbery, 27 percent of State prisoners and 27 percent of Federal prisoners admitted committing their offense to get money to buy drugs (see table 3). In 1997, 19 percent of State prisoners and 16 percent of Federal inmates said that they committed their current offense to obtain money for drugs. These numbers represent a slight increase from the 1991 figures."
http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/factsht/crime/index.html#table3

"In 1988, just over half of the murders in the city [New York City] were 'drug-related.' But once the researchers examined the circumstances of the murders, they discovered that the clear majority, 74 percent, were results of the drug trade, not drug use (14 percent) or the need to get money for drugs (4 percent)." -- OPED: War Won't Solve the Drug Problem. July 15, 1999. Washington Post. By Rob Stewart, of the Drug Policy Foundation.

"The percentage of homicides thought to be drug-related reflects both the frequency of such crimes as well as how the relationship is specified. 'What proportion of homicides is drug-related?' This simple question is difficult to answer. The FBI's definition is specific but limited. Cities or police departments may have broader but inconsistent definitions. For offenses not as reliably reported or as thoroughly investigated as homicides, the question is even more difficult because complete information is not systematically available at the national level for any definition of 'drug-related.' " See the chart below.
http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/factsht/crime/index.html#whystatistics (this chart is no longer on that specific page).

Drug-related homicide rates as defined using differing criteria in four cities, 1990
Percentage drug-related
City 1 City 2 City 3 City 4
Definitional criteria 36.0% 25.7% 39.0% 44.6%
Committed during commission of a narcotics felony x x x
Dispute between dealers x x
Offender under the influence of drugs x
Victim under the influence of drugs x x
Source: Data were obtained by the ONDCP Drug Policy Information Clearinghouse.

In the UK: Transform : Fact Research Guide : Social and economic costs of drug use in the UK.

Parole violations and drugs Edit

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'*Parole violations and drugs. 16.1% is the percentage of parole violators returned to state prisons in 1997 for drug related violations; for failing drug tests, possession of drugs, failing to report for drug testing, failing to report for alcohol or drug treatment. Info is from Table 21 of this report:

U.S. parole revocation reasons. 1997 stats
See chart source with links.

See also Edit

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Propaganda of incarceration nations Edit

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See Wikimedia Commons: Category:Government propaganda. Note the "glorious mission" or "glorious war" nature of much propaganda. Like the Republican-led Holy War, the "War on Drugs". See Wikipedia: War on Drugs. It is really a war on some drug users. This particular glorious war was reinvigorated by the cult leaders, Ronald and Nancy Reagan. Ronald Reagan is still worshiped like a God by some segments of the Republican Party. "The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that you've got it made." - Jean Giraudoux. French diplomat, dramatist, and novelist (1882 - 1944). Share link.
Just Say No. Nancy and Ronald Reagan 2

Nancy Reagan and Ronald Reagan of the USA. The "Just Say No" campaign.

Stalin and child

Joseph Stalin of the Soviet Union.

S.A. brownshirt

S.A. brownshirts in Nazi Germany.

Drug war and incarceration rates worldwide Edit

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Share link: compare
See also: Drug war charts and maps.
See list of incarceration rates by country (b c). Compare the rates. Due to the Drug War the USA has the highest incarceration rate in the world. See cost of U.S. drug war: 1.5 trillion dollars! Let's Break the Taboo! Cannabis is safer! Share link.

The purple elephant in the room:

World incarceration map

Gray in the map means no data. Click map for info, and for ways to share, email, or embed. See map source (and data). Compare incarceration rates worldwide.

The majority of people incarcerated in prisons and jails in the USA are in due to drug-related offenses, crimes to get money for drugs, or drug-related parole or probation violations. Wikipedia: Drug-related crime. The number of inmates in the USA has increased almost 5 times over since 1980. The USA has the highest incarceration rate of any nation (b c). Compare incarceration rates worldwide. See cost of U.S. drug war: 1.5 trillion dollars! Cannabis is safer! Share link.
Correctional population USA

USA: Peak of 7.3 million people in 2007 under adult correctional supervision: On probation or parole, or incarcerated in jail or prison. About 3.2% of the U.S. adult population, or 1 in every 31 adults. More info here. See template.

US incarceration rate timeline

Timeline of U.S. incarceration in prisons and jails as a percentage of Americans of all ages. See template. Image source and data.

"Welcome to America, home to 5% of the world's people & 25% of the world's prisoners."
USA. 25% of world's prisoners 2

Image info, larger banner, template, and stats. More info: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. Most are incarcerated due to the drug war.

USA and territories. 2,424,279 inmates in 2008. ...
In 2008 with less than 5% of world population the USA had over 2.4 million of 9.8 million world prisoners (b). See latest numbers and World Prison Population List. The majority of inmates in the USA are in due to the drug war. The number of inmates in the USA has increased almost 5 times over since 1980.
Inmates per 100,000 population by race and ethnicity

Incarceration rates for adult males in U.S. jails and prisons by race and ethnicity. On June 30, 2006, an estimated 4.8% of black non-Hispanic men were in prison or jail, compared to 1.9% of Hispanic men of any race, and 0.7% of white non-Hispanic men. Image, sources, more recent numbers. More info: The Drug War causes the high U.S. incarceration rates. See template.

USA. Adult and juvenile inmate stats. Share link.
Adult incarceration in the USA. Smaller

Source: Correctional Populations in the United States, 2010. See Appendix Table 2 in PDF. From U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Incarceration rate is per 100,000. See template. See juvenile detention numbers.

Total juvenile detention chart for the USA

Easy Access to Juvenile Populations [6] [7]. See template.

Obama helping turn around Reagan-Bush War on Pot, mandatory minimums, and mass incarceration:

US adult correctional population, 2000-2012

Source: Correctional Populations in the United States, 2012. See Table 2 in PDF.

U.S. incarceration timeline 4

Obama helping turn around Reagan-Bush War on Pot, mandatory minimums, and mass incarceration.

Breaking the TabooEdit

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Home Page (BreakingTheTaboo.info). More info [11]. See TabooBreakers on Twitter. See Global Commission on Drug Policy and Facebook page. Quotes from video clips on the trailer: President Richard Nixon: "total war against public enemy number one". President Ronald Wilson Reagan: "When we say no to drugs it will be clear that we mean absolutely none". President George H.W. Bush: "Some think there won't be room for them in jail. We'll make room". Morgan Freeman: "Since 1971 2.5 trillion dollars have been spent on the War on Drugs". Look who's breaking the taboo: Richard Branson, Kate Winslet, Sam Branson, Morgan Freeman, and many more. See also: MarijuanaMajority.com. Share link. Full version in English is no longer available online. Hey Richard Branson, George Soros, or whoever, please buy it and put it back online!

Cost of drug warEdit

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Cost of U.S. drug war:
Cost of U.S. drug war. Even $1.5 trillion dollars is conservative since many crimes are committed in order to get money for drugs. Correction costs alone averaged $30,600 per inmate in 2007. See: Drug war causes high U.S. incarceration rate. See: Economics - Drug War Facts. See: 32 Reasons Why We Need To End The War On Drugs - Business Insider. See: The Budgetary Impact of Ending Drug Prohibition.
Cost of U.S. drug war

A Chart That Says the War on Drugs Isn't Working. By Serena Dai. The Atlantic Wire. 12 Oct 2012. "The numbers on this chart alone don't add up to $1.5 trillion, which represents a more inclusive count of drug control spending, with prison costs and state level costs determined by the Office of National Drug Control Policy, but instead to $800 billion." See Drug war charts and maps. Share link.

US incarceration rate timeline

Cannabis is safer Edit

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